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Getting up to speed on the Equifax data breach scandal

Still dealing with the exposure of vital data about 143 million Americans, Equifax is trying to clarify language about people's right to sue. The company said Monday that it has made other changes to address customer complaints. (MGN Online)

(AP) -- Still dealing with the exposure of vital data about 143 million Americans, Equifax is trying to clarify language about people's right to sue. The company said Monday that it has made other changes to address customer complaints.

The company is trying to staff up its call centers more in order to handle the increased customer service calls. It also now says people will get randomly generated PINs when they try to put a security freeze in place. People had complained about PINs being based on the time and date requests were made.

Equifax also acknowledged that its language particularly over the right to sue has been confusing at best, and said it was removing that language from their website. The company said that "enrolling in the free credit file monitoring and identity theft protection that we are offering as part of this cybersecurity incident does not waive any rights to take legal action."

Some lawyers have already announced suits that they hope will be class-action cases.

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