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      Bath salts new way to get high

      It's being marketed as "bath salt's" but police warn it's basically a cocaine copy-cat and its legal.

      It's being marketed as "bath salt's" but police warn it's basically a cocaine copy-cat and its legal.

      The powdered substance also known as ivory wave, bliss and vanilla sky contain synthetic chemicals which produce a high similar to cocaine and meth. In fact, Macon Police Chief Steve Olinger says they are more dangerous.

      "It's being described as a methamphetamine high times 10 or a cocaine high times 10 with severe reactions to the body and there's a number of people dying throughout the country by using bath salts," Olinger said.

      Bath salts contain the ingredients MDPV or mephedrone, stimulants that can cause rapid heart rates, seizures and hallucinations.

      "The reports that I'm seeing right now with bath salts unfortunately are being snorted and possibly smoked and they're using it as a methamphetamine or cocaine. Again, unfortunately these consumers don't know what they are putting in their body." said Olinger.

      Until a ban goes into effect in Missouri, there's nothing police can do about the legal substance but police do say they are closely monitoring the situation.

      The St. Louis-area city of Troy has banned the salts. Three other states enacted an emergency ban: Louisiana, North Dakota and Florida. Another three states, Hawaii, Kentucky and Mississippi, have bills pending.

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