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      Constitutional Amendment Three to question teacher tenure

      A Constitutional Amendment that would weaken tenure laws and tie teacher evaluations to student performance will be found on the ballot for the November General Election in the Show-Me-State.KTVO sat down with the Superintendent of Kirksville Schools to discuss the measure.

      That measure is known as Constitutional Amendment Three. If the measure passes, school districts would create their own evaluations for teachers, as well as create contracts for the educators.

      "Teachers would be evaluated more based upon standardized testing, then what they would based upon visits by the administrator of their building," said Dr. Damon Kizzire, Kirksville R-III Schools Superintendent.

      Those in support of the measure say that teacher tenure keeps poor teachers in classrooms too long and that school boards don't have enough decision making power in the hiring, firing and evaluating of teachers. Those opposing the measure say that focusing largely on standardized testing will set educators up for unfair termination. Educators in Kirksville say they are hesitant if the measure were to pass.

      "The majority of that evaluation is going to be based upon tests, student test data, and that's something that we are pretty hesitant to do," added Kizzire.

      Those educators also say that they will lose control over the district and the state will have more say.

      "It is taking local control away from the district and things like that, and it's sending it to Jefferson City," said Kizzire.

      If approved, the measure would make sure that all school districts in the state of Missouri are meeting state standards.

      "Being in Kirksville and looking at the historical data that Kirksville has accumulated, I'd be very concerned about this because Kirksville kids and Kirksville teachers are always working at or above state standards anyway," added Kizzire.

      If the measure does pass in November, it would also limit teachers' employment contracts with districts to three years.