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      DNR optimistic about Premium Standard Farms

      We've reported on the tangle between the state and Premium Standard Farms for a few weeks. Now we're hearing the story from another perspective.

      KTVO spoke with the DNR official who has been working with PSF on the odor issue for almost 11 years. He is optimistic about PSF TMs plan to use the scraper technology to remove manure from the hog barns. We asked if there TMs anything holding PSF back from presenting their proposal to the state.

      I don't think that there's anything holding them back. It's just a relatively new technology that they've only been studying and only had implemented for a short time so I think that it's proceeding normally based on the time that they started looking at it, said Bill Bryan, Deputy Director for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

      Bryan could not speculate on whether or not PSF will meet the August deadline. We asked why he thinks PSF asked for an extension.

      I think the reason is that this is difficult and they are faced with making hard choices, with these competing technologies and they want to find the one that's best for the environment, their neighbors and also best for their business, and they're at a critical junction to make that decision, Bryan said.

      Bryan understands why people think PSF has had enough time to comply with the state. But he tells KTVO they thought it would only take five years when this whole process began.

      He says the DNR will do everything it can to keep PSF up and running.

      We have no intention of doing anything to affect Premium Standard Farms TM ability to continue to provide jobs and do business here in Missouri. We'll work with the Attorney General's Office who has ultimate responsibility for this case and we'll work with the company and the court appointed management advisory team, Bryan said.

      Bryan says the new technology PSF is working on could be a huge breakthrough for the pork industry someday. It would improve the quality of life for people who live around hog barns, and be better for the environment.