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      Safe Thanksgiving Day Food for our Pets

      Can a little reward from the table really hurt your dog? Well, that depends on what it is and what is in it. With Thanksgiving around the corner, we may be tempted to feed our animals scraps from the dinner table, but not everything is safe for them to eat. Dr. Jenny Lindquist, from Lindquist Veterinary Care Center stopped by the set of Good Morning Heartland to break it down for us. WATCH VIDEO above to learn more.

      Scraps are scraps. Don??t scrape the skin and fat from the turkey into your dog??s dish. Eating too much fat can cause serious illness for your dog including pancreas and kidney problems. Turkey properly trimmed can be an excellent protein treat for your dog.

      Plain potatoes, mashed or boiled are acceptable for your dog and have taken the place of grains in many dog foods today. Leave off the gravy, butter, sour cream, or anything else.

      Cook an extra sweet potato for your dog! They??re good to them.

      Green beans are an excellent vegetable for dogs, but not with the usual casserole additions. Keep a few beans aside to mix in your dog??s meal.

      Pumpkin is OK to share with your dog. Again, just keep a small amount aside when making your pie.

      If you are sure that your cranberry sauce has no raisins or nuts in it, you can give your dig a small bit.

      Dogs should not eat desserts and in particular anything containing artificial sweeteners. Xylitol which is in most artificial sweeteners is particularly deadly to dogs.

      Most dog parents know that chocolate should NEVER be given to your dog, but should be extra careful during the holiday.

      Onions, mushrooms, raisins, grapes, and leeks are toxic to pets in large quantities, but why take the chance. Keep in mind that most turkey stuffing recipes contain one or more one or more of these ingredients so don??t feed it to your dog.

      NEVER giver your dog bones from the turkey. Bones can cause choking and also splinter which is extremely dangerous often requiring emergency care.

      Lindquist Veterinary Care Center:

      Kirksville Location:

      1203 N Baltimore St

      Kirksville, MO 63501


      Edina Location:

      Highway 6 West

      Edina, MO 63537